Spon book & spoon carving

Continuing with the weirdness and going totally off-topic from the type of posts you usually find here, let’s talk about a book of spoons and what it meant to me!.

The book is a short one, split into three parts:

  • A story about the author, and how he got into spoon carving.
  • Instructions on spoon carving techniques and knife grips.
  • A beautiful collection of spoons, with some words about each one of them.

I’ve never heard of Barn The Spoon, he is a spoon artisan carving from green wood mostly using a knife and an axe. I actually got attracted to this book after seeing it while attending a workshop on wood carving, the idea of such a specific book and the hippie feel of everything related to carving without any advanced tools picked my interest, so immediately ordered it from Amazon.

I can’t recommend this book to everybody, but the vibe that it transmits it’s something felt close. The story of Barn is an interesting one, worth reading. And the included pictures are gorgeous (yes, those spoon photos are actually amazing, kudos to the photographer). The only point where it fails to me is trying to explain the knife grips using only prose, probably my engineer’s mind is tricking me here, but some drawings on what is trying to be conveyed would help.

After skimming it, and then thoroughly reading the book, Armed with a sharp knife, a hook knife and the explained techniques I started to carve my first spoon. Which was ok, chunky and nicer to look at than to use, but a second one followed, then a third… and after half a year spoons keep coming out of my hands!.

That’s the best compliment to give to the book, it made me want to carve and enjoy the carving process in itself. I feel that this was the point of all of it :-D.

some spoons after this

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Hugo static website on S3

You are in for a treat, static websites are back from the dead (they never left, but were not prominent nor sexy). Combine this with the cheapness of file hostings like S3 and you have a winner here.

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Color2Attribute for Qgis3.x

Well, it didn’t take that much. I ported the small Qgis plugin to Qgis version 3.x. Luckily the renderer classes did not change, so the biggest thing to do was reorganize the code for PyQt5 and all the Qgis2 to Qgis3 API breaking changes. Just one coffee and a morning was enough :-).

It should be available from the qgis repository itself.

Related

Original Post
2.X update
Plugin at the Qgis plugin website
Plugin source

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Color2attribute in QGIS Plugin servers

Something like 7 years ago I created a very small plugin for Qgis (V1.x and V2.x later on).

This plugin was available via my github on a clone and copy fashion.

Yesterday I stopped being lazy and fixed that, The plugin is now available directly from the QGis plugin servers. And can be installed from Qgis itself.

Although I’m late as always since It does not work on 3.x versions.. oh well (look at this changelist!).

QGIS Color to Layer

Related

Original Post
2.X update
Plugin at the Qgis plugin website
Plugin source

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Restoring an old chest

Well, what have you been up all those years? With no update on anything?

Mostly programming, jumping different jobs, started freelancing on my own, wrote a lot of Python, Golang, C. The usual suspects…

And now, for something completely different!. How I spent 4 months of my life restoring and old piece of furniture 😀

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The Fisherman


(Spanish cover, since I like it better)

This blog is dead :-O, so why not create a small entry with the latest book I’ve read that I enjoyed more than usual?

Quite an inventive horror story. I’m not a big horror reader (mostly Stephen King, some of Poe and Lovecraft), but the theme was one of what I believe is classic cosmic horror (Leviathan and incomprehensible things) with some original sprinkles.

The book is split in two stories. What I would consider the main story (Dan and Abe), and a long flashback (Rainer and the origin of the evilness). And this seems to be quite divisive between the readers of this book. I’m leaning on the side that the main story is fantastic, while the flashback takes too long to develop and eats half of the book for no added benefit.

That nitpick apart, the story of Abe the widower and how meeting Dan transforms his life, for good and bad, is an amazing one, and John Langan knows how to paint the scenes beautifully. Let me tell you, that there’s a couple of passages that gave me goosebumps, and if I have to go take a leak at night my brain ensures that I remember them.

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Filed under books